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Sea turtle nesting begins in May on many beaches

News Release

Wednesday, May 09, 2018

Media contact: Diane Hirth, 850-410-5291; Carli Segelson, 772-215-9459

Photos available on the FWC’s Flickr site: https://flic.kr/s/aHsjyyDTLQ External Website

Sea turtle nesting video b-roll available on MyFWC Vimeo:https://vimeo.com/257783160 External Website

May is the beginning of sea turtle nesting season on many of Florida’s sandy beaches. Beachfront property owners and beach visitors can help nesting turtles and hatchlings by turning off or shielding lights that are visible from the beach at night.

 “People’s efforts to keep our beaches as dark as possible at night, without affecting human safety, can make a tremendous difference for nesting sea turtles,” said Robbin Trindell, head of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) sea turtle management program. “Female sea turtles and their hatchlings can be disturbed or confused by artificial light, whether it comes from a house, a flashlight or a cellphone camera.”

Sea turtle nesting is starting now on beaches from the Gulf coast, including northwest Florida, to the state’s northeast Atlantic coast and from Miami-Dade County south to the Keys. Nesting began earlier in March along Florida’s southeast Atlantic coast from Brevard County south to Broward County.

Florida is a critically important destination for nesting sea turtles. More loggerhead turtles nest here than anywhere else in the continental United States, with nearly 97,000 loggerhead nests counted statewide during the 2017 nesting season. Leatherback and green sea turtles also nest in significant numbers in Florida.

What are the basics of being sea turtle-friendly?

Buildings and other structures along the beach that need lights for human safety can be lit with long wavelength amber LED bulbs in a downward-directed, well-shielded fixture that is not visible from the beach. The FWC tests lights submitted by manufacturers to see if they meet our “Keep it long (wavelength), Keep it low (lumens and mounting height) and Keep it shielded” requirement. Approved fixtures are less likely to impact nesting or hatchling sea turtles. The agency maintains a list of these certified wildlife-friendly fixtures so property owners along Florida’s coastlines can easily find options that work for human and sea turtle safety. The list is available at MyFWC.com/Conservation by clicking on “How You Can Conserve,” “Wildlife Lighting” and then “Certified.”

The FWC works to conserve Florida sea turtles, including coordinating nesting beach survey programs around the state. People can help by reporting sick, injured, entangled or dead sea turtles to the FWC’s Wildlife Alert Hotline: 1-888-404-3922, #FWC or *FWC on a cellphone or text Tip@MyFWC.com.

 Learn more about Florida’s sea turtles at MyFWC.com/SeaTurtle.

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